Vaidotas SegenisInvestor, portfolio manageger, drummer,Some time ago
2000s vs now:

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Mangirdas AdomaitisArtificial inteligence, Data science
Invest in index?
2 months ago
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Marius ČiuželisInvestor / Advisor / Social Entrepreneur
, short the index :)
2 months ago
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Kristina SedereIT M&A consulting, sparkling wine lover, Running & Hiking enthusiast
From Tech analysis point of view - Too early to say - we might see a bull market before the crash.
2 months ago
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Andris BerzinsVC investor, former startup founder, startup activist, weekend warrior
people have been saying that and losing money for several years now. No end in sight...
2 months ago
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Mangirdas AdomaitisArtificial inteligence, Data science
Exactly. Market always seems overvalued, but then goes up even more.
2 months ago
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Marius ČiuželisInvestor / Advisor / Social Entrepreneur
, , been there done that. I do remember 2007, when China’s stock market skyrocketed with triple digit growth and we’ve started warning clients to take profits. Since Feb, our first calls, market gained another 100% and some clients called us stupid amateurs. What happened next is only a history. Btw, same was back in 1998-1999. This time is different? Heard that many times during my tenure in capital markets and it never ever proved itself. Regarding current madness only time will tell, but what really drive me crazy is the fact that financial theory doesnt apply anymore to asset pricing, fundamentals and asset prices diverge further and further. IMHO, it’s not sustainable, however, nobody will tell you how long that might last.
2 months ago
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Mangirdas AdomaitisArtificial inteligence, Data science
agree this looks suspicious. But what to do with the suspicions? Shorting is out of question for majority since too risky in my opinion. 1. Going into Utilities? Gold? 2. Holding cash/bonds. Holding cash opens risk for inflation + missing further market growth. Weird times..
2 months ago
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Marius ČiuželisInvestor / Advisor / Social Entrepreneur
, personally I put scepticism aside and started more detailed due diligence on crypto funds. There are plenty of them, some act more like index funds, other go both long and short. The main questions are custody and liquidity and for both you can find good options. Thus the conclusion: if you cant explain / understand traditional market rationale / logic / fundamental, why not to explore some alternatives?
2 months ago
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Mangirdas AdomaitisArtificial inteligence, Data science
Put some thoughts about this discussion during weekend. For me investing is also being part of something larger. Possibly life quality increase, more happiness, global productivity increase, better healthcare, EVs, etc. Small piece of company represents me this very well + financial benefit of-course :) Now regarding other alternatives. Alternatives looks far less transformative. Some alternatives i think about(dozens alternatives not tried or not-familiar at all) 1. Gold/Silver(If shit hits the fan). But it does not create value by just sitting around. 2. P2P lending. Not transformative, but serves some purpose. Especially in Lithuania(non-competitive bank market, tight rules). 3. Bitcoin. I don’t see Bitcoin usage increase in any aspect of life, which was expected for many years. Similar behaviour to Gold/Silver - buy and hold. Blockchain as a technology innovation is very slow. sre you leaning towards funds trading digital coins? Or simple buy and hold option? Funds could have advantage due small market capitalisation and less competition. Would mind sharing some specific funds?
2 months ago
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Marius ČiuželisInvestor / Advisor / Social Entrepreneur
, funds of course, who trade both long and short. I’m not a fan of b&h. Re usage: take the last big hit - paypal will start accepting it. And that’s already a huge hit (that was one of the reasons for current spike in price).
2 months ago
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A nice essay about the evolution of marketplaces by Li Jin and Andrew Chen, both investors @ A16Z. The first thing they say that the next trillion-dollar opportunity lies in services vs. goods. Why? In the past twenty years, we’ve transformed the way people buy goods online, and in the process created Amazon, eBay, JD.com, Alibaba, and other e-commerce giants, accounting for trillions of dollars in market capitalization. The next era will do the same to the $9.7 trillion U.S. consumer service economy, through discontinuous innovations in AI and automation, new marketplace paradigms, and overcoming regulatory capture. The service economy lags: while services make up 69% of national consumer spending, the Bureau of Economic Analysis estimated that just 7% of services were primarily digital, meaning they utilized the internet to conduct transactions. There is a clear trend that software is eating the service economy, but it’s been slow, and they unpack the reasons for that in the article. They also cover how marketplaces were evolving over the last decades, essentially in 4 eras: 1. The Listings Era (1990s). These marketplaces were the digital version of the Yellow Pages, enabling visibility into which service providers existed, but placing the onus on the user to assess providers, contact them, arrange times to meet, and transact. 2. The Unbundled Craigslist Era (2000s). Companies iterated on the horizontal marketplace model by focusing on a specific sub-vertical, enabling them to offer features tailored to a specific industry. 3. The ‘Uber for X’ Era (2009-2015). In the early 2010s, a wave of on-demand marketplaces for simple services arose, including transportation, food delivery, and valet parking. These marketplaces were enabled by widespread mobile adoption, making it possible to book a service or accept a job with the tap of a button. 4. The Managed Marketplace Era (Mid-2010s). Managed marketplaces take on additional work of actually influencing or managing the service experience, and in doing so, create a step-function improvement in the customer experience. Rather than just enabling customers to discover and build trust with the end provider, these marketplaces take on the work of actually creating trust. The big question is, what’s next? My answer is Qoorio. Watch the interview here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zl14Ty5-0Ko Read the article here: https://a16z.com/2018/11/27/services-marketplaces-service-economy-evolution-whats-next/
What’s Next for Marketplace Startups? - Andreessen Horowitz
a16z.com
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Stephen NeweDigital Marketing StudentSome time ago
"Practice makes perfect." Sounds more like a curse. In this day and age everything moves a million miles an hour and perfectionism can be a hinderance. Don't strive for perfection, you need to do, just do. Figure it out as you go. You will fail, hit speedbumps, be challeneged but you will ultimately succeed and overcome those challenges. Don't strive for perfect, strive to do, to create, to be proud. You will hone your craft but it takes time. Patience is tenacity.
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Not NakanoWork in motorsport world. Finding new talents, growing with passion 🏍️🏎️Some time ago
Growing with passion is the first step towards happiness.
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