Monika Kuzminskaitė on NeuroscienceHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
There are two ways of not paying attention - when your mind wanders or when it is completely blank. They actually are two distinct neurological states. In this study the task for the participants was to press the button when they saw a number on the screen - any number except for three. Participants also were asked regularly whether the feel focused, thought about something else of felt blank. In the "wandering" state, they made more wrong choice mistakes (pressed the button when they were not supposed to press it). In the brain scan it looked similar to the state of high arousal and impulsivity. In the "blank" state participant more often missed to press the button on the number, and the brain looked more similar to sleeping brain. In both cases some areas of the brain seemed to be sleeping while others showed regular awakened state patterns. The research team hopes to delve deeper and understand how attention and hyperactivity disorders function (which also very often are related to poor sleep) - and perhaps identify way of treating it. 👆 and I want to draw your attention, once more, on how brilliant our brain is. If it needs rest, it can make us rest, even if it is like this, "sleeping with one eye". Maybe children who are very distracted, are also very sensitive and very tired of processing this amount of information - and maybe more periods in calm environment would be very beneficial for their attention? Maybe your mind constantly wandering when you should be focused on work also means that you give yourself too much work and too high of a goal, and don't rest enough? Or maybe when you intend to rest, you engage in another activity that keeps your mind active instead of allowing it to rest? Well, then have a good weekend, and do rest :) Book my talk to know more about importance of sleep to your mind! My name is Monika, I am health and nutrition psychologist. I help to deal with daily and difficult questions about behavior, thinking, emotions. I write, teach and provide psychological counselling. Study: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23890-7.pdf Photo: Markus Kammermann from Pixabay #spoonfulofreason #psychology #attention #rest #fatigue #sleep
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Monika Kuzminskaitė on NeuroscienceHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Early autumn is a great time to talk about mushrooms. This study was performed with the help of mice (thank you, again, even if you did not ask for it - hopefully this one was beneficial). One dose of psilocybin has increased the density and size of the dendritic spines due to their increased growth. The effect was rapid, visible after 24 hours after the effect, and still significant after one month. Other results indicate that this effect decreased stress induced behavior deficit (or "cured" the learned helplessness) and increased the excitatory neural signals - probably newly formed nerve connections allowed to form and express new behaviors. Just in case - psilocybin is a known hallucinogenic substance, usually produced from mushrooms, but little researched because it carries a stigma of being a drug. No, I still do not encourage you to take on individual experimenting with mushrooms, but scientific research would be so awesome! My name is Monika, I am health and nutrition psychologist. I help to deal with daily and difficult questions about behavior, thinking, emotions. I write, teach and provide psychological counselling. Book my talk to know more about psychology, neuroscience and mushrooms! Photo: adege from Pixabay Study:: https://www.cell.com/neuron/fulltext/S0896-6273(21)00423-2 #spoonfulofreason #psychology #psilocybin #musrooms #fungi #neuroscience #dendrites

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Monika Kuzminskaitė on NeuroscienceHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Research. how general anesthetics works in the brain? Japanese researches studies the effects of a common anesthetic, isoflurane. This compound blocks high frequency impulses that are necessary for cognitive and motor functions., but allows low frequency impulses that are necessary for life supporting functions, such as breathing. Isoflurane partially blocks release of neurotransmitters, and this decreased "capacity" is not sufficient anymore for more intense, higher frequency signals to go through. Article: https://www.technologynetworks.com/neuroscience/news/scientists-reveal-how-general-anesthesia-works-in-the-brain-334006 Research: https://www.jneurosci.org/content/40/21/4103 Photo: Free-Photos from Pixabay Book my counselling seession here: https://fb.com/book/saukstasproto/ ||| Lots of long reads and chance to support me as well as to win free session: https://www.patreon.com/saukstasproto
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Monika Kuzminskaitė on NeuroscienceHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Research. Apparently, we are still evolving! Programming code is not activating the usual suspect brain regions - math, language or logic. Such type of activity rather activates a so called multiple demand network, which processes several signals from different areas of the brain and both hemispheres. Sounds quite renaissance! With, that, I demand that IT profession is classified as exact science! OK OK, just kidding. But still, brings a whole another perspective on how we think. And code. Article: https://www.technologynetworks.com/neuroscience/news/your-brain-on-code-the-brain-processes-code-differently-from-language-344087 Research: https://elifesciences.org/articles/58906 Photo: James Osborne from Pixabay My name is Monika, I am psychologist. I help to deal with daily and difficult questions about behavior, thinking, emotions. I write, counsel and teach. #spoonsfulofreason #brain #research #cognition #code
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