Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Today I will write from myself personally, even though all of it will be based on academic research, you'll have to trust me on that :) Let's say that yesterday you had few bites too many of the herring, salads, bread or other Christmas Eve goodies. Let's also assume that you had plenty of duck yesterday, and then a bit more, and then just that bit with a roasted skin, opened one, another, third gift package with chocolates and gingerbread cookies, and then "something else" on top of that. Let's. Then cocoa. Then mulled wine. Holiday foods are so many, holiday time so short. Today feel a little empty already - all traditions are already performed, greetings sent, but it feels like holidays are not over yet, screens are full of magic, wish to take on chores is nowhere to be seen, and... you find yourself on your way to yet another helping of sweets and then continue onto sofa. And just look at all those left-overs, peeping from the fridge. Can't just throw away it all, you just can't. But today is an important day. If now, right this moment you will put away whatever you are eating and will go back to your regular diet, will not try to rescue leftovers, will not attempt to stretch out holidays by eating more - your digestive system will still treat these two days as irregularity. Look at the time ahead - today is Saturday, the we will have Sunday, next week we will have either vacation, or "noone is really working". Holidays will truly be over on January 4th. And you still have plenty of cookies, and you wish to continue with that magic, and put-here-your-own-reason. So if you continue eating like you did for past two days, your slow but steady digestive system will have plenty of time to build a new "regular", you will grow gut bacteria that love sugar (and they will demand more of sugar), and you will want more and more sweets. If you treat your wishes as masters, then it will probably end like it usually does. This is why today is the best day to make a change. No, holidays do not have to be just sitting and eating. Even when you cannot travel, it can be reading, drawing, sleeping (a rare luxury to many of us), going for a walk, taking pictures, knitting, watching a long due movie, calling mom once more, opening new page in a diary and listing goals of your life, of next year, or perhaps just upcoming days, your good and bad qualities, finding recipes for healthy food for this next week, writing a letter to someone who you are angry at (and perhaps ripping it to bits) or so people whom you are missing and who already passed to next life. PErhaps this might be more in holiday spirit than another dose of magic from the screen. Besides, that is not going anywhere - and your time is. WIshing you true holiday spirit for your thoughts, and healthy food in reasonable amounts for your digestive system. Starting now. Please share in comments what are your holiday activities that can replace sitting and eating. Photo: Manolo Franco from Pixabay My name is Monika, I am psychologist. I help to deal with daily and difficult questions about behavior, thinking, emotions. I write, counsel and teach. #spoonfulofreason #psychology #whattoeatafterchristmas #christmas #food #nudge
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Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Another book that I would like to recommend. Not the only one of this kind, I will come back to this later as well. Even though it is not psychology, but this knowledge is still very important. One of the obstacles that does not allow to achieve the desired result is lack of knowledge about how things work. If you stand in front of the door with the key in your hand, but have no clue how to use it - you can spend loads of time just standing there, experiencing despair, anger, blaming the door, the key, yourself or the others. But the door will not open because of this. Accepting this fact, also that knowledge needs to be verified, collected, updated - is the field of psychology. This specific knowledge - on food and eating - currently is developing very rapidly. There are still things that are valid, but a lot of other things that are new, and even contradict the previous "truths" - to avoid fats, to snack, to eat until full and not get hungry by any means, to eat sugars or food in general in order to have energy (whatever that is), to be able to compensate by exercising if you ate more the day before, to be able to "burn" excess food, etc. Now we know more, so we can treat our bodies a lot better and achieve results a lot faster. Bon read. #spoonfulofreading #books #psychology #nutrition
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Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Research. People tend to eat more when they feel more positive emotions as well as they feel more negative emotions than usual (here we should think of both celebrations and stress situations). On top of that, people tend to eat more after they overeat (here we should think about feelings of guilt and helplessness). I short, emotional peaks are a risk for overeating. My take on this: it does not really matter whether you "let yourself go" during vacations, or you "seek comfort" in food when stressed - too much food is too much food, with all the consequences. Emotional problems need to be resolved using emotional tools (like deliberation, planning, behavior rehearsal, speaking), and food needs to be used food-related issues (obtaining nutritional substances). Your dismay or frustration does not have a role in the physiological digestion process. Research: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Hande_Oenguen_Yilmaz/publication/348297086_How_does_emotional_appetite_and_depression_affect_BMI_and_food_consumption/links/5ff6cb4645851553a026d5db/How-does-emotional-appetite-and-depression-affect-BMI-and-food-consumption.pdf Photo: Jill Wellington from Pixabay My name is Monika, I am psychologist. I help to deal with daily and difficult questions about behavior, thinking, emotions. I write, counsel and teach. #spoonfulofreason #psychology #eating #emotions
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Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Several things you should know about the Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder, ARFID. It is not "just" a picky eating. This eating disorder causes great psychological and physical stress, people may gag or choke if trying to swallow something that causes them anxiety - foods of specific texture, smell, appearance, or something they choked on before. Because of this people may avoid eating situations all together, like cafeterias or parties. This disorder may be the cause of serious weight loss of failure to grow. People with this disorder are not concerned with their weight or body image as often is the case with other eating disorders. It may occur in people of all ages and genders. Along with this disorder, people may experience anxiety, mood disorders, symptoms from autism spectrum. Cognitive behavioral therapy is effective method of help - it focuses on exposure and response prevention. Article: https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/blog/more-picky-eating%E2%80%947-things-know-about-arfid Photo: Pexels from Pixabay Book my counselling seession here: https://fb.com/book/saukstasproto/ ||| Lots of long reads and chance to support me as well as to win free session: https://www.patreon.com/saukstasproto
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