Health psychologist, with special love for food and eating matters
Vilnius, Lithuania

Eating is so much more about mind than digestion. It is about what we know, how we make choices and decisions, our attitidues, problem solving and planning abilities, social influence, habits, memories, goals, motivation. And yes, also about hormones, neurotransmitters, microbiome and other wonderful things. And all of that happens before you take every bite or sip.

Lithuanian or English.
Curious about something?
If you want to learn more about something Monika might know, don't hesitate, just ask them to share an insight.
MY TOPICS
Topic is a subject user would like to share its knowledge about.
Talk options
Choose how you’d like to meet Monika and arrange your talk
GlobeCreated with Sketch.
5% donated to Mėlyna ir Geltona, VšĮ
HumanCreated with Sketch.
1 h

Ask me anything about food and eating psychology
€30
HouseCreated with Sketch.
1 h

One councelling session
€35
Get qoorio
Discover humans, learn & share your own knowledge
Curious about something?
If you want to learn more about something Monika might know, don't hesitate, just ask them to share an insight.
Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersabout 15 hours ago
66: Bulimia To me word "bulimia" always was a little bit funny, even though there is nothing funny about it. Laughs aside, a spoonful of reason - first of all. Bulimia (bulimia nervosa) is an eating disorder with typical uncontrolled binging episodes, dying which person eats a lot of food, usually very quickly, until significant pain is felt. High level of concern with body image is also very usual. This concern often is expressed as an attempt to compensate for the large amount of consumed food. Everyone does that, you say? Other symptoms to look out for is regular visits to bathroom after a meal, throwing up, calluses on the knuckles (they form due to multiple attempts to induce vomiting), constant use of laxatives, intense workouts, and, of course, eating binges when abnormally large amounts of food are consumed. You should pay attention to gathering food supplies in the bedroom or other secret spots, where it can be eaten away from the eyes and judgement of others. Sometimes such food can be "special", different from the usual food. "A lot" of food should imagined as at least several portions of your regular lunch. The consequences of bulimia usually are eroding teeth enamel, sores on esophagus, electrolyte imbalance (which may affect heart and other internal organs), frequent constipation, rupture of the stomach. Body weight is usually normal, so one cannot readily recognize someone with bulimia, while anorexia usually is more visible. Having said that - bulimia sometimes comes together with anorexia. Cognitive behavior therapy is very efficient in treating bulimia while drug treatments also help a little. Another detail - treatment of all eating disorders is usually most productive if all family takes part in it. If you feel that you do have it or know someone who does - please contact your family doctor or specialized eating disorders center. ‐‐--------------------- My name is Monika, psychologist. I help to deal with daily and difficult questions about behavior, thinking, emotions. I write, counsel and teach.

Appreciate
Comment
Ask
Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating matters3 days ago
Research. If adolescents sleep too little, or if the quality of their sleep is poor, they risk to develop metabolic syndrome and disruption of endocrine hormone function, leading to overweight. Sleep quality and duration are sensitive to increased screen time, especially at night and and early school start times. As another consequence, adolescents are more prone to making poor food choices, from choosing relatively nutrient-poor foods to consuming excess calories without necessarily increasing their energy expenditure. Good night, adolescents, and put away your screens. Oh, adults - you too. Research: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2451965020301083 Photo: Javier Rodriguez from Pixabay
4

Appreciate
Comment
Ask
Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
7 small changes that may make a big difference for your weight loss - #7 Doesn't work for you? That happens. One of the bigger reasons behind it - goals that are too ambitious. Let's see if you tried these things: 7. Find some professional help. Whatever helps you according to your beliefs and self-assessment. It may be personal trainer, dietologist, dietist, shaman, priest, psychologist, coucher, it may even be intelligent and sincere friend. When I say "professional help", I mean all the people who know how to help specifically you in your specific situation with your specific resources and limitations. They need to be people with professional capability to listen. ANd I do not have the people who will complain, blame, judge, try to distract you and will not be otherwise helpful. Such help is quite varied, because ways to the goal are in thousands, and everyone needs to find the one that fits the best and provokes only the smallest resistance from inside. For example, shamans and witches are very interesting to me, and I have great respect for them, but I will not search for help from them, because I will be too busy trying to understand "how it works", and will not focus on doing what I am told. Others may feel the same about doctors and psychologists (by the way, I am more than willing to explain "how it works", covering physiology and neurology as well, because they are also very interesting to me). Anyway, an objective point of view and assessment, even one single well placed question may be that specific nudge that will start you on the right way. (last one, sixth one is here: https://business.facebook.com/202246430252793/posts/1101643176979776/) Photo: Oldiefan from Pixabay
1

Appreciate
Comment
Ask
Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
7 small changes that may make a big difference for your weight loss - #6 Doesn't work for you? That happens. One of the bigger reasons behind it - goals that are too ambitious. Let's see if you tried these things: 6. Go forward in small steps. Very seriously. Yes, of course, your goal is great and amazing, but plan only few small steps ahead at a a time. No-one eats the whole elephant in one bite, because, you of course, understand, this is not a motivation issue. Let's look at it from neurochemical perspective. Let's say that your first small step is to put two teaspoons of sugar instead of one to your coffee. Easy? Peace of cake! I just did it. Very good, now praise and compliment yourself, and admit achievement, so you can get your small dose of dopamine. It was easy to achieve, you got your pleasant feeling, and you will be motivated to do this again. Now, the most important step - if you use this small dose of dopamine to do something significantly bigger (because why not) - like switching from your disordered to eating to raw diet, buying loads of food and all the gadgets - then you will get very tired from "eating" this "elephant very quickly, just in few days. And most probably you will just stop altogether, either after admitting openly your failure (which demotivates), or by finding sixty eight other reasons of why the conditions are unfavorable (which also demotivates). If you use that small dose of dopamine to strengthen your self-confidence (see, you can do it, great - what shall we do tomorrow?), and will take another small step tomorrow - imagine, how far you will go in a year? Great goals are not achieved not because they are difficult to reach, usually - but because we are trying to go too far too fast (like "reach your ideal weight in just seven days without any effort!" Right...). We can go as far as fable about the hare and the tortoise... Anyway, what matters is constant and relentless stepping, and not the length of the stride. Not at all. (tomorrow we'll get to the last one) Photo: Oldiefan from Pixabay
1

Appreciate
Comment
Ask
Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
7 small changes that may make a big difference for your weight loss - #5 Doesn't work for you? That happens. One of the bigger reasons behind it - goals that are too ambitious. Let's see if you tried these things: 5. Try to notice negative thoughts about eating or emotional eating. Start only with that, just notice a thought and name it accurately. This is the first and most important step towards changing your eating habits. Do not work towards any bigger goals just yet. The point where you can change direction and improve your behavior is beyond this thought, beyond admitting that you eat because you are bored, sad, angry or just use food as replacement for whatever you want to avoid. When you notice that you eat because you are bored, you can focus on resolving boredom. If you do not notice that, you keep eating because this is the habit, because it feels good to eat and because you never thought of another alternative. (tomorrow we'll get to sixth)
4

Appreciate
Comment
Ask
About qoorioHelp
We use cookies to personalise content, provide social media features, and analyse our traffic. We value your privacy and only use the most necessary and analytical cookies. You can opt out at any time.