Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Listen to your gut, says USA student, who by the way studies interoception - human capability to perceive internal processes of the body (like pain, hunger, fatigue, etc.). If we do not clearly understand what signals our bodies send us, we cannot take good care of it. For example, if we don't know that most of the serotonin is produced in the gut (we just discussed that), we cannot ensure that we have lively movement in the gut or optimal mood, appetite, sleep, memory or attention regulation. Students (in my opinion - most of the working people) who are in constant stress, overworked, keeping poor sleep and eating hygiene, are at especially high risk if missing the important signals of the body and not taking care of it. All internal organs have numerous nervous connections to the rain (including vagus nerve!) - and they are in place for intensive information exchange. This is why we tend to define the emotions we feel in somatic terms (sinking heart, butterflies in the stomach, cold feet, etc.) - and various physical distresses make us feel and think differently. The connections go both ways. One research has identified that women with different gut microbiota react differently to negative emotional material - there are different patterns of activity in brain's hippocampus, areas processing attention, emotions and sensory information. So, by paying more attention to your body signals, to how different food affects your well being, by ensuring wider variety of gut microbiota (think fermented and soured products, like yoghurt, kefir, soured cabbage and kimchi, kombucha, aged cheese, small amounts of wine and beer, sourdough bread, olives, etc.) - you will ensure a better balance of internal processes in your body and improved well-being. Learn to hear what your body says by practicing daily meditation, breathing or mindfulness, and make sure you provide sleep, rest and quality nutrition whenever your body asks for it. Article: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/student-notebook-listen-to-your-gut Photo: 5598375 from Pixabay Book my councelling seession here: https://fb.com/book/saukstasproto/ ||| Lots of long reads and chance to suppot m as well as to win free session: https://www.patreon.com/saukstasproto

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Benedetta MarchiorelloViolin player
I did find meditation a good way to improve my attention regulation as many times when people do speak I do get lost in their words. I did really enjoy meditation then after a nice cup of concentrated teobronine to improve my level of serotonine and happiness. I did hear even in the SIFNUT symposium that is currently going on a big -no- towards junk food and I got a bit upset as I do love fonzies, burgers from Bayron. Moreover my past neighbour used to love KFC. She used to think that their burgers were great even if people that eat them are more often involved with food poisoning. I think that it is great the idea that you don’t breath just through the lungs but that different part of our holi body do consider breathing as sweating and heating and is able to breath in a way that is indipendent from the gas exchanges in the bronchi and alveoli. I do feed myself according to a Mediterranean diet in order to ensure to my microbiota an intake of different micronutrients in equilibrium.
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Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Another book that I would like to recommend. Not the only one of this kind, I will come back to this later as well. Even though it is not psychology, but this knowledge is still very important. One of the obstacles that does not allow to achieve the desired result is lack of knowledge about how things work. If you stand in front of the door with the key in your hand, but have no clue how to use it - you can spend loads of time just standing there, experiencing despair, anger, blaming the door, the key, yourself or the others. But the door will not open because of this. Accepting this fact, also that knowledge needs to be verified, collected, updated - is the field of psychology. This specific knowledge - on food and eating - currently is developing very rapidly. There are still things that are valid, but a lot of other things that are new, and even contradict the previous "truths" - to avoid fats, to snack, to eat until full and not get hungry by any means, to eat sugars or food in general in order to have energy (whatever that is), to be able to compensate by exercising if you ate more the day before, to be able to "burn" excess food, etc. Now we know more, so we can treat our bodies a lot better and achieve results a lot faster. Bon read. #spoonfulofreading #books #psychology #nutrition
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Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
Research. People tend to eat more when they feel more positive emotions as well as they feel more negative emotions than usual (here we should think of both celebrations and stress situations). On top of that, people tend to eat more after they overeat (here we should think about feelings of guilt and helplessness). I short, emotional peaks are a risk for overeating. My take on this: it does not really matter whether you "let yourself go" during vacations, or you "seek comfort" in food when stressed - too much food is too much food, with all the consequences. Emotional problems need to be resolved using emotional tools (like deliberation, planning, behavior rehearsal, speaking), and food needs to be used food-related issues (obtaining nutritional substances). Your dismay or frustration does not have a role in the physiological digestion process. Research: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Hande_Oenguen_Yilmaz/publication/348297086_How_does_emotional_appetite_and_depression_affect_BMI_and_food_consumption/links/5ff6cb4645851553a026d5db/How-does-emotional-appetite-and-depression-affect-BMI-and-food-consumption.pdf Photo: Jill Wellington from Pixabay My name is Monika, I am psychologist. I help to deal with daily and difficult questions about behavior, thinking, emotions. I write, counsel and teach. #spoonfulofreason #psychology #eating #emotions
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Monika Kuzminskaitė on Food & Eating PsychologyHealth psychologist, with special love for food and eating mattersSome time ago
73: Barriers to the healthy nutrition As I am back to the city, I am also back in the flow of messages encouraging me to "let yourself go", "to treat myself", "to go for the sweet sin"... Without too much effort it is easy to see that healthy eating is seen as trouble while almost-non-food items that are also lots-of-pleasure products are shown as a guaranteed benefit. Almost like cocaine, but it is not popular to be advertised and definitely not legal to be distributed. How have we come to this - things that are good are difficult, and not a pleasure? I have looked at some qualitative research hoping to find what are the reasons as told by the people themselves. Men in United Kingdom say they avoid to choose healthy food because they have a cynical attitude towards government's messages on healthy eating, besides, healthy food does not taste well and is not satisfying. Authors believe this is related to the need of men to be independent and strong (which may mean they do not agree with government and to avoid deprivation (1) Australian children and their parents state that the primary barrier to the healthy nutrition is contradicting messages sent to the children - what advertising says and what parents say are two different things, you need to void fats, and fats are necessary, salt is both harmful and beneficial, TV has both useful and harmful shows (2) Adolescents in Ireland say that they do not choose healthy food, because they do not get the expected physical and psychological reward when eating healthy food, (mis)understanding of what is food and what is healthy eating, contradicting social pressures regarding food, and basic misunderstanding of what healthy nutrition is. Interestingly enough, healthy eating concept is masked behind pressure to eat unhealthy food and pressure to be thinner (3) UK adolescents say that they do not choose healthy food because of poor food quality in the school, also very accessible, relatively cheap and personally more tasty fast food. Supporting factors are family support, accessible healthy food, wish to care about the body image and a power of will (4) Speaking about the healthy elementary school children nutrition, their parents say that among barriers they see food provided in school, opinion of the peers (some foods are not "cool"), poor example shown by brothers and sisters, also parents and grandparents that are not living together. Parents did not see their own example as important. Parents believe that children have unchangeable tastes which shape the diet of their children. Finally, parents believe (researchers say - incorrectly) that healthy food must be prepared at home, fresh, organic, and because of all that - hardly accessible (5) Older British men say that they do not follow healthy diet because they lack skills to cook and they lack wish to change their life habits (6) There are many more research papers. But conclusion for me is quite sad. We are used to cook and eat in certain way, and unhealthy one, we have a habit of thinking that we must get the food quickly, and that time spent on cooking is time wasted (even if we are learning to cook healthy food - this is still considered the waste). We simply ignore any long term healthy eating consequences and keep luring ourselves with an instant pleasure, even if we will blame ourselves afterwards, daily. What is your reason to "treat yourself" with unhealthy food? ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 1. Barriers to healthy eating amongst men: A qualitative analysis: http://www.660607.co.za/.../Course.../Mens%20eating.pdf 2. Healthy eating, activity and obesity prevention: a qualitative study of parent and child perceptions in Australia: https://academic.oup.com/.../Healthy-eating-activity-and... 3. Adolescents' views of food and eating: Identifying barriers to healthy eating: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/bitstream/2438/6577/2/Fulltext.pdf? 4. Young people and healthy eating: a systematic review of research on barriers and facilitators: https://academic.oup.com/her/article/21/2/239/671343 5. Promoting healthy diet and exercise patterns amongst primary school children: a qualitative investigation of parental perspectives: http://s3.amazonaws.com/.../Promoting_healthy_diet_and... 6. Old and alone: barriers to healthy eating in older men living on their own: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/.../HughesBennettetal2004.pdf Photo: andreas160578 from Pixabay My name is Monika, I am psychologist. I help to deal with daily and difficult questions about behavior, thinking, emotions. I write, counsel and teach. #spoonfulofreason #psychology #food #barriers #nutrition #eating
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