Marius Čiuželis on Silver EconomyInvestor / Advisor / Social Entrepreneur
Some interesting trends emerge The Venture Capitalists Making a Bet on Aging Consumers https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-07-29/primetime-partners-vc-fund-makes-bet-on-aging-consumers
www.bloomberg.com
www.bloomberg.com

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Robert PožarickijTech & Software
As the article pointed out, I think the thing that's difficult to get right is marketing products for the older cohort of people. Dignity especially can be easily overlooked. Hopefully, raising demands for such products will stimulate competition and innovation, which in turn will get us closer to the ultimate goal: improving the lifes of older people.
3 months ago
Marius ČiuželisInvestor / Advisor / Social Entrepreneur
Sure it takes time to refocus and adapt to this consumer group however the one rhing is clear - its growing quite fast and its purchasing power will overtake the others in a decade or so.
3 months ago

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Marius Čiuželis on Sidabrinė linija (the Silver Line)Investor / Advisor / Social Entrepreneur
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Marius Čiuželis on Sidabrinė linija (the Silver Line)Investor / Advisor / Social Entrepreneur
Philanthropy is a buyers’ market, and nonprofit leaders are seldom in a position to negotiate aggressively with potential donors. On the contrary, the selection process is (and feels) quite one sided, as though potential grantees are participating in a beauty contest in which the only imperative is to please the judges. So, for better or worse, the views of an individual donor (especially a very large one) can strongly influence grantee behavior. Often this influence will take the form of tweaks to an existing program, or the addition of a new activity, more or less aligned with the nonprofit’s existing strategy, about which a leading donor is enthusiastic. When such an intervention is supported on the donor’s part by deep knowledge of the field, it can provide helpful input to the grantee’s strategy. Friday has started with an email from the Ministry of Social Affairs: We would like to inform you your project was reviewed by our experts, it met all requirements and we would like to offer you to sign financing agreement. That means M. Čiuželio labdaros ir paramos fondas (M. Ciuzelis Charity Foundation) won the biggest in its 5 years history financing tender for Sidabrinė linija (the Silver Line) - a free of charge be-friending and support helpline providing information, friendship and advise for the old age people. Without any further conditions, the way we presented and wished to implement our project. The day just couldn’t be any better. Thank you

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Ronaldas BuožisCinematography, tech and boats
Congrats!
Marius Čiuželis on Sidabrinė linija (the Silver Line)Investor / Advisor / Social Entrepreneur
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