Lukas Eigėlis on Make it debatable!Debater, activist, working with youth policySome time ago
It was a cathartic experience to be a first-time voter. Having debated on many of the key questions of this election, it was interesting to not defend a predetermined position, but rather think about my own reasoning and decide who I agree with the most. I never considered not participating in my democratic duty. However, a lot of Lithuania's young people did, with our turnout barely crossing 1/3rd. Maybe a return to quality political debate, focusing on the issues rather than show, is something that can bring them to the ballot box. Additionally, youth policy and issues relevant to young people weren't expanded on in many of the parties' manifestoes. Youth NGO sector hopes the 13th Seimas will remember about the young people of Lithuania more often.
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Justas Janauskas on Ask me anything you wantQoorious humanSome time ago
What is the purpose of debate? Most of us, if asked, would say it’s about helping someone with an incorrect, harmful idea see the light. It’s an act of kindness. It’s about getting to the truth. But the way we tend to engage in debate contradicts our supposed intentions. Much of the time, we’re really debating because we want to prove we’re right and our opponent is wrong. Our interest is not in getting to the truth. We don’t even consider the possibility that our opponent might be correct or that we could learn something from them. As decades of psychological research indicate, our brains are always out to save energy, and part of that is that we prefer not to change our minds about anything. It’s much easier to cling to our existing beliefs through whatever means possible and ignore anything that challenges them. Bad arguments enable us to engage in what looks like a debate but doesn’t pose any risk of forcing us to question what we stand for. It’s never fun to admit we’re wrong about anything or to have to change our minds. But it is essential if we want to get smarter and see the world as it is, not as we want it to be. Any time we engage in debate, we need to be honest about our intentions. What are we trying to achieve? Are we open to changing our minds? Are we listening to our opponent? Only when we’re out to have a balanced discussion with the possibility of changing our minds can a debate be productive,avoiding the use of logical fallacies. Bad arguments are harmful to everyone involved in a debate. They don’t get us anywhere because we’re not tackling an opponent’s actual viewpoint. This means we have no hope of convincing them. Worse, this sort of underhand tactic is likely to make an opponent feel frustrated and annoyed by the deliberate misrepresentation of their beliefs. And if you’re a chronic constructor of bad arguments, as many of us are, it leads people to avoid challenging you or starting discussions. Which means you don’t get to learn from them or have your views questioned. In formal situations, using bad arguments makes it look like you don’t really have a strong point in the first place. Read more about bad arguments and how to avoid them: https://fs.blog/2020/05/bad-arguments/
Bad Arguments and How to Avoid Them
fs.blog
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Adomas Matusevičius on How to make a warehouse work?Logistics pro. In an interesting way.Some time ago
What to do to do nothing? In today’s hyper effective office workplaces you are tempted to think that doing nothing is some sort of a sin. Having nothing to do is a waste of your time and consequently - of someone else’s money (usually your bosses). Manufacturers used to call it (and some still do) a downtime and a downtime usually means inefficiency a.k.a. - a loss. But in the same way that the workplaces in offices have become hyper effective, the workplace of a service provider, blue collar worker has become more unpredictable: orders are erratic, plans usually are more of a fairy tail than a thing to follow and uncertainty is the most certain thing. Loosing time as a service provider is quit often a normal thing - some orders get canceled, plans are not fulfilled and forecast are a myth. On these often occasions one is tempted to find something to do. If one is not a freelancer and has a boss, the boss usually encourages that seeking of “self worth”. So, how can doing nothing in this case be good? You want to be useful, your boss wants you to be useful. Who is wrong here? Doing nothing usually will not bring you more income on its own, but it can be a useful measurement tool of your success. Figures vary from industry to industry, but if you, as a service provider, can reach a “free” or “lost” time portion of 20%, you are on a right track (german industry standard). In this case, doing nothing (but you need to be sure, that there is nothing planned to do) and measuring that free time will let you know how much free time in your process you have. Never mind, that that time can’t be immediately used - it is the measurement of the whole process, not that particular task. I would like to link some references for these insights, but it’s just my experience and the way I was lucky to use it. Using that free time and reaching a goal of 20% as a service provider could be another topic for the future.
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Three Types of Marketplace Shifts: Changing Without Breaking The Marketplace “Making decisions about shifts in value, control, or risk is hard. It’s scary. Perhaps the shift will offset the special equilibrium of trust and value that exists in the marketplace...mechanics you may privately confess not to even fully understand. And it’s emotional. While that’s true for any change or big decision at any company, it’s doubly true when the company is serving multiple customers at once. In a marketplace business, different parts of the company will, by design, see themselves as allied with one of the marketplace parties more than the others. Sales will advocate for the supply side. Marketing may advocate for the demand side. Product teams, depending on their focus area, will have a bias for their segment or constituency. And Finance, Legal and Policy teams will often lean towards more control, more value, and less risk for the business. This type of partisanship shouldn’t be disappointing to you. It’s ultimately a good thing! It's checks and balances. But it can result in some charged debates when marketplace shifts are required.” Full article: https://www.giladhorev.com/posts/three-types-of-marketplace-shifts-changing-without-breaking-the-marketplace
Three Types of Marketplace Shifts: Changing Without Breaking The Marketplace
www.giladhorev.com
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