Karolis Grigas on Web developmentFront-end developer, dancerSome time ago
Current most popular way of developing web - React - is not sustainable. And that is a sentiment shared by React dev team (@dan_abramov at https://twitter.com/dan_abramov/status/1259614150386425858?s=20) and a great article at https://macwright.org/2020/05/10/spa-fatigue.html It's interesting that web development is going through a common phenomenon of circling back into old truths and a lost way of developing software. Client-side only applications are not sustainable, slow, and are only trying to emulate what a simple static html file with some styling and javascript sprinkled on top does. But it never will, purely because of the overhead of running the code, whose results should've come from backend in the first place. And that goal - static html with javascript small enough to fulfill interactivity on the open page - sounds eerly similar to how web used to be developed 10 years ago. Output some html, and manually write javascript for that page in particular. Very performant, but equally fragile and unscalable when it comes to complexity. Meanwhile, the modern tooling and developer experience for managing complexity is absolutely great. So joining these two things together sounds like a positive direction. Our web applications should serve the results of running it as the main response, with minimal post-processing needed. It should serve minimal javascript for that page, and that page only. Browsers know how to navigate, and they do it ridicilously well. At the same time, from developers experience application mental model remains what it is now - application is one, sound, and non-leaky model which can transition and resume it's state and any point, broken down into components with the same properties. It's just that these components don't return complete representations of themselves, but only minimal result in form of html, with minimal interactivity in form of javascript. The future sounds exciting.
Second-guessing the modern web - macwright.org
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Santino Dummett on Self developmentI teach business and startups for free!Some time ago
When you read a non-fiction book, do you remember it? I love reading development books (Atomic Habits, How to Win Friends, etc) but I would only remember perhaps four or five key points afterwards, even if I really enjoyed the book I wanted to not only remember more of it, but also maximise my use of the book in my life. I tried starting a reading club, which fizzled out. I tried a podcast with a friend, which we became too busy to do regularly. In the end, I have settled on a good solution: -read a chapter -go back through the chapter and write down the main points (as if you were going to give a podcast on the chapter after) -at the end of the book, once you have notes for each chapter, go through them and write ten essential points for the entire book and five great quotes -add these fifteen things to a ‘development book’ that you refer to regularly -use these fifteen things to come up with 2-5 actionable things you will do every day/ week/ month/ time you do ‘x’ activity, based off this -write these 2-5 things in an ‘action’ section of your development book, as well as adding them to your daily/ weekly/ monthly routines as required The difference this makes is immense- reading the book takes twice as long (or more), but the takeaway from the book and impact in your life is ten times the size. Try it and see how it goes!

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Luis Tavira JiménezEstudiant
Thanks for the insight!😋
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Vytautas Galaunia on DevelopmentSoftware engineer @qoorioSome time ago
Using Xcode? xcrun simctl delete unavailable Could be helpful, I personally regained 20Gb of disk space
Donny Wals @ 🏡 on Twitter
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Lilla Strobel on Business DevelopmentTech Regulatory | Quality ConsultantSome time ago
Who you should listen to when developing a product? Hurray-you are a leader of a brand new startup, you already convinced investors that your product is awesome. Now you have to develop and sell, and you are good, right? Your friends are here to help, and you will do it like pros, right? No need for negative voices, right? Wrong! As a leader, the only thing you want to hear is compliments. But what you need to hear is constructive criticism, the people who believe you, but not unconditionally, they are not your friend but they want you to be successful, as their reputation depends on your success. You should listen to everyone who wants to keep your business legal: your lawyer, your regulatory specialist. Yes, any nasty business can destroy their reputation, and no one wants to hire any professional with a shady history, and excuses are also not helping. So if they are letting you go, that is a huge red flag. You should also listen to everyone who has more experience in your field, than you do. Sometimes I meet CEOs who say they never ask the potential customers for feedback, because they think customers know nothing about innovation. Facepalm. How do you want to develop a good product if you don't know what do you do? This attitude is only ok when you develop something for yourself! My favourite situation was when a company developed a device for greenhouses that already existed, but there are now better products on the market. You want to know what your customers feel, what makes their life/work easier. Real professionals don't wake up at 4 a.m. because they are mindful, but because they must! Standing in the middle of the night in the freezing cold with a bunch of candles is not the latest wellness trend, but farmers have to protect young trees from the cold, or their years of work will be destroyed within one hour. Mascne is not a Covid invention, healthcare workers know it for years. These people also learned to have their degree, but their job is way more demanding than yours, and what they need the least is a condescending idiot CEO, who says they are doing it wrong. Of course, you don't have to become a physician or an engineer to understand their problems. Just listen to them! Fun fact: I am also not a doctor, but I checked all the devices I worked with in action, yes I also attended to operations.
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