Justas JanauskasCEO @ Qoorio, Co-Founder @ Vinted, Angel InvestorSome time ago
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Audrius JanulisTech, Marketing, Comedy | Startups @ Google
Poshmark 👀
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Erikas MališauskasJack of all trades, master of design 🎨
Gotta love Shopify!
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Nerija Skvernelytė on What it takes to manage a team?Head Of Marketing @QoorioSome time ago
Have a lot of thoughts buzzing in the head, but feel crap at articulating them to your team or others? I feel you. It happens to me. ALL.THE.TIME! 🙄 You feel like you have a lot of ideas and have the reasoning why they are great and that you can take over the world with them. But when they come out of your mouth, what you say doesn’t have the same power when you vocalize them. And unfortunately what sounds great in your head just doesn’t translate to anything valuable, impressive or inspiring to your team. Not all of us are born great orators, but when we have a passion, we can talk hours about it. Meaning, we have a bunch of words and sentences around the topic, but the key is to concentrate the most valuable part of the whole idea into a short pitch. So…what to do? Basically you have to practice explaining things to people. Here’s a few tips I from my experience, that I feel helped me a lot: 1️⃣ TREAT IT LIKE A STORY “It all started, when…” Not everyone operates on the same level of information as you do, so even if it feels stupid and common sense most of the time when working in a team, start with giving a back story to why your topic/suggestion/idea is important. This introduction is a great way for you to keep the flow of your talk, have everyone onboard and not jump into the middle of the story where context might get lost for people that have less information about what you are telling. 2️⃣ HAVE A PLAN Have the end goal in your head, where you want the listeners to be taken to by your story. Even if what you will be telling or discussing goes all different directions, you will have this powerful lighthouse - the main point that you want to conclude to. 3️⃣ BE PREPARED if you have time, let’s say - have a meeting about something - do some research and challenge your idea asking WHY it is important to discuss and HOW it could be perceived different than you think. In that case - you will feel solid if you get these questions, will express your opinion more firmly, taking possible doubts into consideration, and increase the chance that conclusions will be made as you expected. 4️⃣ MAKE IT FLOW Thoughts usually are very chaotic. In our heads, they are random keywords which you roughly know how to combine into this huge concept. Try putting your thoughts into text. When you do this exercise, you will be faced with a challenge of construction - have to write it down so that it has structure, flows nicely and makes sense in general. After doing so, you will have the structure in your head: what is starts from, why it matters, how you propose to approach it and what value will this idea bring to listeners. 🙃 P.S. See what I did here? I think Qoorio insights are a great way to start practising structuring your talks and inspiring your team 😉
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Arūnas Brasas on World of racingMotorsport news editorSome time ago
This week Sergio Perez shared his memories about how 15 years ago he was kicked out of Red Bull’s tests, because he was too slow. And that short story brought some memories. I was writing news for a local website when Perez was racing in GP2. I know, long time ago, but it doesn’t matter. So, the times of Sergio Perez and Pastor Maldonado. Back than both were known for their aggressive style of driving and for causing incidents. Those two had money and were aggressive on race track. And if you don’t know, race fans usually don’t like racers with money who creates, let’s say, chaos on track. Even though most of us know, that you have to have lots of money if you want to race on a high level. So when both of them came to Formula-1, not everyone were very happy about that. Maldonado and his Venezuelan oil money went to Williams and Perez with Carlos Slim’s money went to Sauber. But it’s not about money. Before Perez went to F-1, he was already a member of Ferrari’s Drivers Academy (FDA). So that and his sponsors helped him to step up from GP2 to F-1. Maldonado and Perez were still aggressive. One more than another. With time Perez have changed, but for good. He was still aggressive, but used that aggressiveness for his own good, not creating a chaos. Different story about Maldonado. He won a race in F-1, but for most F-1 fans Pastor was a synonymous with a crash. Back then when he was racing in GP2, there was a story about his driving style and his actions on track. It said, that Pastor’s results got better after he became less aggressive. Well, that was just one of few reasons why his results got better. The thing was, if you can learn from mistakes and change your driving style, you can reach better results. After few years people’s opinion about Perez have changed. And Pastor was... well, still Pastor. Perez didn’t became a most popular driver. But he learned how to use his aggressive driving style for his own good. He became a better driver. Perez managed to reach good results, few times finished on a podium with teams that were not strongest ones. Far from it. And all those years spent in F-1 were not easy for Checo (Perez’s nickname). Even with all those money from Mexico, there were few times when he didn’t know if he will be in F-1 next year. In 2013 he left FDA so he could sign with McLaren. Big opportunity for Perez. Sadly, wrong time, wrong place. Then there were Force India times. Still hanging in F-1. But few years ago Force India had some serious problems with money and almost disappeared from F-1. Team was saved, had new owners, Perez signed new long term contract and... at the end of last year he had to leave a team, because Aston Martin, previously known as Force India and Racing Point, just wanted to sign a contract with Sebastian Vettel. No hard feelings, just business. Once again, people were asking if Perez will be racing in F-1 next year. Red Bull wasn’t happy with Alex Albon (that’s a different and long story), so they signed Perez. A contract with a top team. Big opportunity? Maybe. Will see. It’s interesting to see how people’s life can change. Checo... from aggressive and sometimes unlikable, to a good driver who really knows how to manage tires and be strong on a race day when it matters the most. It’s not always about a money or your driving style. You just have to learn from your mistakes, learn how to adopt to certain things, be patience and wait for your moment. Like Perez did many times. Maybe this year will not be his best, but like Checo said, he has nothing to lose. And of course - the Red Bull. Kicked out Perez from testing, because he was too slow and signed him 15 years later. No one is saying they did wrong back then. It’s just all those Red Bull actions sometimes puts a smile on your face. Just remember, they kicked out Daniil Kvyat then sign him few years later. They kicked out Alex Albon then sign him later. Now it’s Perez’s turn. No one knows if we will see him in F-1 next year. At least we know he can win.
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Lukas Eigėlis on Make it debatable!Debater, activist, working with youth policySome time ago
It was a cathartic experience to be a first-time voter. Having debated on many of the key questions of this election, it was interesting to not defend a predetermined position, but rather think about my own reasoning and decide who I agree with the most. I never considered not participating in my democratic duty. However, a lot of Lithuania's young people did, with our turnout barely crossing 1/3rd. Maybe a return to quality political debate, focusing on the issues rather than show, is something that can bring them to the ballot box. Additionally, youth policy and issues relevant to young people weren't expanded on in many of the parties' manifestoes. Youth NGO sector hopes the 13th Seimas will remember about the young people of Lithuania more often.
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