⚠️ Attention, experiment! ⚠️ Adam Malevski and I decided to try to have a public conversation on Qoorio. How does it work? Instead of chatting in private, we talk asynchronously on Qoorio via comments. We think that exposing such discussions might be beneficial for other people like Adam. Do you think this is a good idea? Let us know in the comments. Adam writes: “Hello, my name is Adam, and I’m founding app called Happer. I would like to get some advice about bootstrapping and launching a mobile app. How what are the best product launch strategies?” Me: I believe there is no such thing as a universally best product launch strategy. Every business is unique, therefore have unique, tailored specifically to that business strategies. Strategies of one business rarely fit other businesses. Figuring out the best strategies for your business is one of the key tasks of the founding team. Tell me more about your app, what it does, and what your current plan is to launch it?

Adam Edvin MalevskiFounder of Happer
I forgot to mention that all activities in app are location based.
3 months ago
Justas JanauskasQoorious human
Do I understand correctly that the main concept is to connect two different kinds of people: (i) those who seek activities with (ii) those who organize/provide them? Or the main concept does not require different people to connect at the same time and place. Think of reading guidelines/tips for the best sightseeing routes and following them on your own. I am asking because the first and the second cases require very different approaches.
3 months ago
Adam Edvin MalevskiFounder of Happer
The main concept is to connect people with same interests in the same place. The only requirement is to be in same area. Maybe example with sightseeing was bad because app won’t help guiding. Better example would be: imagine you came to Vingis park and want play beach volleyball. With app you would let everyone in park (or nearby) know that you want play volleyball there and connect to others.
3 months ago
Justas JanauskasQoorious human
So you (i) either annouce that you want to play volleyball, or (ii) you see other people who want to play it and then join them, correct?
3 months ago
Adam Edvin MalevskiFounder of Happer
Correct
3 months ago
Adam Edvin MalevskiFounder of Happer
Just came to mind: it's like Tinder but for activities.
3 months ago
Justas JanauskasQoorious human
In this case, one way of looking at your business is a marketplace way. In essence, you have two sides: (i) supply and (ii) demand. Supply is people who announce that they are looking for mates. Demand is people who watch what's available in the market in a certain area and join them if they like. A transaction is when people meet. A successful transaction is if people are happy after the meeting so that they recommend your service to their friends. I recommend you to read an excellent piece written by Lenny Rachitsky, ex Growth PM @ Airbnb. He is sharing insights on how to kick start marketplaces from 17 of today's biggest marketplaces, including Airbnb, DoorDash, Thumbtack, Etsy, Uber and many more: https://www.lennyrachitsky.com/p/how-to-kickstart-and-scale-a-marketplace In essence, the model is the following: 1. Constraint. Except for one company, every single marketplace he interviewed constrained their initial marketplace to quickly get to critical mass. To some, this may seem counter-intuitive — why limit your growth and opportunities when you start out? It turns out that the best way to get big is by first going small. In your case, consider constraining your business to a specific area (Vilnius?), and maybe even a specific one or a few activities (bbq, volleyball, etc.) before you go to other areas. This will allow you to spend your marketing euros more effectively, build critical mass faster, and learn faster on a smaller scale. Proving the concept in one area is faster than everywhere. And that can unlock opportunities for additional funding to replicate your local model to other areas. 2. Supply. The vast majority of successful marketplaces focused almost all of their resources on growing supply early-on (80% of the companies I interviewed, 14 out of 17). Consider focusing most of your marketing efforts on supply – people who announce that they are looking for mates. If there are no cool girls in Tinder, then there will be no demand for the app. Probably the same goes for your app. 3. Direct sales (supply). One-on-one direct sales ended up being a crucial lever for about 60% of the companies, twice as common as the next biggest lever (piggy-backing and referrals). Think of onboarding the initial supply directly – reach out to people and ask them to join your app, listen why they would or would not do that, iterate the product based on what you learn. 4. Word of mouth (demand). Word-of-mouth was the most important growth channel for over half of the companies. Though this isn't actually a growth "lever", it was an enormous growth driver for these companies. It was a strong early signal of product/market fit. In your case word of mouth is possible only if people are pleased after meetings. So, think of how to match them, so they have as many positive experiences as possible. Another piece I recommend you to read is by the same Lenny Rachitsky, ex Growth PM @ Airbnb, who collected first-hand accounts of how essentially every major consumer app acquired their earliest users, including lessons from Tinder, Uber, Superhuman, TikTok, Product Hunt, Netflix, and many more. His biggest takeaways from this research: 1. Just seven strategies account for every consumer apps' early growth. 2. Most startups found their early users from just a single strategy. 3. The most popular strategies involve going to your user directly — online, offline, and through friends. Doing things that don't scale. 4. To execute any of these strategies, it's important to first narrowly define your target user. 5. The tactics that you use to get your first 1,000 users are very different from your next 10,000. Read more in the link below. https://www.lennyrachitsky.com/p/how-the-biggest-consumer-apps-got
3 months ago
Adam Edvin MalevskiFounder of Happer
Thank You Justas for great answer. It gave me great insights about initial launch.
3 months ago
Justas JanauskasQoorious human
Feel free to come back here to continue the conversation:)
3 months ago
Thomas DesimpelAngel Investor, Polyglot, Real Estate Investor
Adam Edvin Malevski following the conversation between you and Justas Janauskas; what would be the main differentiator of your app as simular tools are already on the market (Eventbrite etc ) ? There are so many apps already on a user phone why would they choose yours? More important the 'chicken and the egg problem'..., Which one could be best for building your app?: Just trying to help😊🙂...: https://www.nfx.com/post/19-marketplace-tactics-for-overcoming-the-chicken-or-egg-problem/
3 months ago

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Well said, Justas Janauskas. Allowing people to act on their ideas and fail requires courage and trust.
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Being a founder & CEO, quality decision making is critical. Bad decisions just cost so much time, money, and nerves, while good decisions move the whole company further. To make good decisions, one needs to have a clear, sharp, calm, and well-rested mind. Taking care of your mind requires effort, like taking care of your body. That’s why my #1 goal of the new year resolution of 2020 was ‘sleep well’. Sleep deprivation wreaks havoc on the brain, affecting mood and worsening depression, exacerbating pain, and undermining executive functions that affect judgment, planning, organization, concentration, memory, and performance. In other words, the critical functions of a founder. Next to that, hormones influencing weight and growth become imbalanced. Immune dysfunction, leading to an increased susceptibility to illness, and a pro-inflammatory state develop. Sleeping well is a habit that takes time and effort to build. It starts with awareness. Read nine simple tips from a Stanford neurologist for quality sleep here: https://qz.com/quartzy/1341003/a-stanford-neurologists-nine-simple-tips-for-quality-sleep/
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