Who is more effective as a leader, introvert, or extrovert? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant says his research shows that introverts and extroverts are equally effective as leaders, based on their companies' performance or teams. Whether introverts/extroverts were more or less effective depended on the kind of employees they had. Extroverts are better leaders with reactive followers, people who are looking for direction from above. If I am an extroverted leader, I will fire you up, get excited, and you will be ready to follow the direction I have created. Introverted leaders were more effective with proactive employees. If you have a whole team of people who bring their ideas and suggestions to the table, who are taking the initiative, extroverted leaders would feel threatened by that. They are like "don't steal my spotlight, I am in charge here". That has two negative effects: (i) they shut those people's ideas down, and (ii) they left their people demotivated. Introverts were much more likely to listen. And make people feel valued and get better ideas to the table. And we live in the world now where we need more proactivity from the employees. As the world is more dynamic and competitive, as a leader, you cannot see everything what is happening or going to happen. Given that proactive employees are more important than ever before, introvert leaders are going to be more effective in the future. Agree or disagree?
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Justas JanauskasQoorious human
Ronaldas, Nerija, Gabija, Justinas, do you think I am more introvert or extrovert?
4 months ago
Justinas MačiulisHead of Legal & Finance at Qoorio
Justas Janauskas you are an extrovert during parties and a bit of both on regular days. For sure you have the skill to listen and this might lead you to believe of an introverted leadership, but I do not feel certain about that. My gut feeling says that you are an extrovert with a few well developped introvert skills (i.e. ability to listen, empathy (to some extent), etc.).
4 months ago
Dominykas RimšaProduct & UX Designer
As far as I can think of most modern day leaders have more introverted tendencies (think Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs, Bill Gates etc). Extroverts do life coaching 😅
4 months ago
Nerija SkvernelytėHead Of Marketing @Qoorio
Justas Janauskas you are an more of an introvert in my opinion :) I think you like people and interesting conversations, but do not seek mass attention all the time
4 months ago
Ronaldas BuožisCinematography, tech and boats
Justas, definately introvert:)
4 months ago
Aurimas ŠeputisSoftware Engineer @Qoorio
Justas I believe that being introvert/extrovert is less of how you present yourself and more of how it makes you feel. For example do you feel exhausted after intense talk sessions with a group of people or feel refreshed? Introverts need alone time more than socializing time, extroverts the opposite, but both need to have both in their lives. People tend to do less of what makes them exhausted or at least to a limit.
4 months ago
Rūta MrazauskaitėPublic policy analyst / Lawyer
Could it be that good leaders are adaptive to the extent where they can be both sometimes? 🤔I deeply believe in authentic leadership and bringing your true self to the way you lead, so it does make sense that introverts and extroverts would (want to) lead a bit differently. However, the best leaders I have met over the years were actually extremely adaptive. They would fire up a quiet colleague, then turn around and become an attentive listener to a proactive one...
4 months ago
Justas JanauskasQoorious human
Makes total sense, Rūta, Aurimas!
4 months ago
Povilas GodliauskasFounder & Coach @ coach.lt
⚠️ WARNING, a brain dump coming. Despite such great progress in personality theory and testing (e.g. big five, hexaco), it is unfortunate that we are still using dichotomous models (extrovert/introvert) to describe or, I would stay, classify people into categories. 🤦‍♂️ I guess, the reason behind the overuse of such classifications is their simplicity: you are either this or that, so why bother? However, just because the model is simple and easy to use, it does not mean that it is valid and reliable. Still not convinced? If so, you should look at more complex versions of the model (e.g. Jungian, MBTI) which essentially suggest that extroverted/introverted are not people's personalities themselves but rather their personality functions. Therefore, you get people who, let's say, are ENTJs. What is unique about them? Well, they have extroverted thinking (primary function), introverted intuition (2nd), extroverted sensing (3rd), and introverted feeling (4th). Example 1️⃣: think of orators or business leaders (e.g. Bill Gates, Steve Jobs) who usually come up with ideas while talking out loud, usually to others (therefore, extroverted thinking), and rely a lot on their intuition based on creativity (therefore, introverted intuition). Or you get INTPs whose personality functions are ordered in the same sequence, but temperament is mirrored, i.e. thinking is introverted (1st), intuition is extroverted (2nd), etc. Example 2️⃣: think of engineers and scientists (e.g. Albert Einstein) who are also very insightful, but they prefer thinking in private (therefore, introverted thinking) and using intuition based on observation (therefore, extroverted intuition). If we go on, we will get at least 16 varieties of extroverts and introverts‼️ And to me, the model still does not do justice. Why? Because the model does not account for type variety. For instance, two people who are considered ENTJ can demonstrate different degrees of extroverted thinking, despite that it is their primary function. Therefore, models such as big five are much more scientific and valid, as they are tested against huge population samples and provide percentiles of traits rather than categories. Moral of if this thought dump: using only two types to classify people is fun, but too simplistic, unproductive, and, with all due respect to those who do not know better, super lazy, especially if we want to understand people rather than classify them.
4 months ago
Erika MaslauskaitėTech Business Developer, Ambassador at WomenGoTech, Co-founder of LOGIN
Povilas, Rūta, well put and said! From my experience working with different type of leaders I could definately say that flexibility and adaptiveness is a key thing to success and empowerent of the team. Lead by example they say, however every person has or had different examples and every case is different and that means it is crutial to have the flexibility and trust towards the team you work with! Great insight Justas! :)
4 months ago

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If you are a founder or a CEO, read this great interview with Daniel Ek, Founder and CEO of Spotify. In this interview: On a Typical Day → On Good Meetings → On Being Intentional with Time → On Personal Time Management → On Creating an Open Calendar → On Company Bets → On Delegated Decision Making → On Working in Flow → On Learning as a Personal Habit → On Founders → On Spotify and Content Acquisition→ On Creative Process → On Acquisitions → On Shadowing Other CEOs → On his Personal Leadership Style → On Handling a Board → On Swedish Culture → On Algorithms → On Becoming a Father → Link: https://www.theobservereffect.org/daniel.html
The Observer Effect – Daniel Ek
www.theobservereffect.org

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Marijus KrasnickasValue Creator Through Unity. Founder of UNO Parks. Your Gold Fish.
Justas Janauskas thanks for sharing. #SharingIsCaring
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As a CEO, I often have no clue what I am doing, what is my job/role, and where this company is going to. I often think that the company I am building is a total BS 💩. Also, I sometimes feel that we are implementing the most genius idea, and it will turn over the world. And then I have a crystal clear clarity of the future and how we are going to get there 🚀. Then I ask myself if I am slightly bipolar, and googling around that proves true 😭. If you can relate to this, don’t worry, this does not prevent you from building a unicorn 🦄. Surprisingly 🤷‍♂️. #fridaymood #ceoconfession

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Sam Altman, CEO @ OpenAI, ex President @ Y Combinator writes about idea generation: “The best ideas are fragile; most people don’t even start talking about them at all because they sound silly. Perhaps most of all, you want to be around people who don’t make you feel stupid for mentioning a bad idea, and who certainly never feel stupid for doing so themselves.” “Finally, a good test for an idea is if you can articulate why most people think it’s a bad idea, but you understand what makes it good.” Read full post here: https://blog.samaltman.com/idea-generation
Idea Generation
blog.samaltman.com

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Povilas GodliauskasFounder & Coach @ coach.lt
Well said, Justas Janauskas. Allowing people to act on their ideas and fail requires courage and trust.
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