Good morning qooriors! First-principles thinking is one of the best ways to reverse-engineer complicated problems and unleash creative possibility. Sometimes called “reasoning from first principles,” the idea is to break down complicated problems into basic elements and then reassemble them from the ground up. It’s one of the best ways to learn to think for yourself, unlock your creative potential, and move from linear to non-linear results. This approach was used by the philosopher Aristotle and is used now by Elon Musk and Charlie Munger. It allows them to cut through the fog of shoddy reasoning and inadequate analogies to see opportunities that others miss. Musk gives a fascinating example about battery packs: … they would say, “historically, it costs $600 per kilowatt-hour. And so it’s not going to be much better than that in the future. … So the first principles would be, … what are the material constituents of the batteries? What is the spot market value of the material constituents? … It’s got cobalt, nickel, aluminum, carbon, and some polymers for separation, and a steel can. So break that down on a material basis; if we bought that on a London Metal Exchange, what would each of these things cost? Oh, jeez, it’s … $80 per kilowatt-hour. So, clearly, you just need to think of clever ways to take those materials and combine them into the shape of a battery cell, and you can have batteries that are much, much cheaper than anyone realizes. Learn how to think from the first-principles in this article I read this morning: https://fs.blog/2018/04/first-principles/
First Principles: The Building Blocks of True Knowledge
fs.blog

Agne NainyteDigital Transformation | Process Excellence | Women Empowerment
Great article! Thanks for sharing it. An alternative or additive approach - Pareto principle. Try to find ~20% of parts which contribute to ~80% of your problem (most expensive parts). We use this principle a lot in Lean problem solving methodology.
4 months ago
Justas JanauskasQoorious human
Thanks, Agne, I know LEAN for a long time, however never practiced in my business. Would love to read some materials of your recommendation.
4 months ago
Agne NainyteDigital Transformation | Process Excellence | Women Empowerment
4 months ago

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Sam Altman, CEO @ OpenAI, ex President @ Y Combinator writes about idea generation: “The best ideas are fragile; most people don’t even start talking about them at all because they sound silly. Perhaps most of all, you want to be around people who don’t make you feel stupid for mentioning a bad idea, and who certainly never feel stupid for doing so themselves.” “Finally, a good test for an idea is if you can articulate why most people think it’s a bad idea, but you understand what makes it good.” Read full post here: https://blog.samaltman.com/idea-generation
Idea Generation
blog.samaltman.com

Povilas GodliauskasFounder & Coach @ coach.lt
Well said, Justas Janauskas. Allowing people to act on their ideas and fail requires courage and trust.
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Being a founder & CEO, quality decision making is critical. Bad decisions just cost so much time, money, and nerves, while good decisions move the whole company further. To make good decisions, one needs to have a clear, sharp, calm, and well-rested mind. Taking care of your mind requires effort, like taking care of your body. That’s why my #1 goal of the new year resolution of 2020 was ‘sleep well’. Sleep deprivation wreaks havoc on the brain, affecting mood and worsening depression, exacerbating pain, and undermining executive functions that affect judgment, planning, organization, concentration, memory, and performance. In other words, the critical functions of a founder. Next to that, hormones influencing weight and growth become imbalanced. Immune dysfunction, leading to an increased susceptibility to illness, and a pro-inflammatory state develop. Sleeping well is a habit that takes time and effort to build. It starts with awareness. Read nine simple tips from a Stanford neurologist for quality sleep here: https://qz.com/quartzy/1341003/a-stanford-neurologists-nine-simple-tips-for-quality-sleep/
A Stanford neurologist’s nine simple tips for quality sleep
qz.com

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