Povilas Godliauskas on Emotional IntelligenceWell-being Psychologist | Mentor | Lecturer | Consultant | HR |Some time ago
If you are single and feel lonely, turn up the heat in the room or put on warmer clothes before you go on a Tinder rampage. 🔥 As it turns out, people experience higher levels of loneliness in colder environments, which increases the need for social contact. However, the need decreases when they feel warmer or experience tactile warmth, a direct result of physical contact. 🐻 This is not surprising why short-term dating spikes between October and February (the so-called "cuffing season"), one of the direct outcomes of colder seasons. Fortunately, it's already summer, so you can be more conscious of the people you want to date! ☀️ And if you are still not sure, maybe it is time to talk to somebody? Link to the study. 👇 https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2019-79280-001
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Povilas Godliauskas on Emotional IntelligenceWell-being Psychologist | Mentor | Lecturer | Consultant | HR |Some time ago
Think twice before deciding which side you are on, while you are listening to other people trash-talking their managers, colleagues, or partners. ⚠️ According to a recent study, by siding with the interlocutor, we are just adding more fuel to the conflict, which discourages the interlocutor to forgive and make peace with the other party. To be supportive, we do not have to choose a side. The most important thing is to create a safe space for the other person to vent their emotions and collect one's thoughts. We can do it by asking open questions, such as: ✔️ What happened? ✔️ How does it make you feel? ✔️ Why is it important for you? ✔️ What is the next step? Remember that our goal as good conversational partners is not to condemn anyone but rather be patiently present with the other person. 👌 Link to the study: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31464479/
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Povilas Godliauskas on Emotional IntelligenceWell-being Psychologist | Mentor | Lecturer | Consultant | HR |Some time ago
It's not the tech giants that are responsible for the negative effects of their digital products, including various hate crimes and increased suicide rates. It's the ad-driven business model that is endorsed by their investors. I recently watched a Joe Rogan podcast where he talked to Tristan Harris, an ex-Google engineer and one of the people behind the documentary "The Social Dilemma" (2020). They talked a lot about the problems of social networks, such as manipulative algorithms and their direct effects on the political climate, which I found really interesting. However, what they did not really talk about are the billionaires who are the major shareholders of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc., essentially providing the ground for all the problems we are facing right know. Who are the major investors of these companies? What are they thinking about? Unless they are psychopaths, why aren't they pulling their money out of these ethically flawed ventures? If the negative effects of social media are so big of the deal, as described in the documentary, why aren't we including the elephants in the room? ~3000 billionaires is not a lot to with whom to have an adult conversation. As a side note, if every person just stopped for a second before scrolling one's biased feed or sending the hate-driven comment and asked oneself "Why I am really doing this?", maybe we would not be even having this conversation.

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Povilas GodliauskasWell-being Psychologist | Mentor | Lecturer | Consultant | HR |
I am not sure if that is the case. All people (both rich and not) rationalize to a certain extent. It would be interesting to learn what are they really thinking instead of projecting our own ideas.
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Povilas Godliauskas on Emotional IntelligenceWell-being Psychologist | Mentor | Lecturer | Consultant | HR |Some time ago
For many, "Social Dilemma" (2020) has been an eye-opening experience. For me though the most eye-opening fact was the overblown reaction to the film. 😶 It's not that we never realized our data was (ab)used for marketing purposes, social media was addictive, or engineers were not the most avid users of their products. It's that many knew (at least deep down) they shared a bed with the devil. However, suddenly some people stumbled upon a visually pleasing (but super predictable) documentary and now the world looks different. To me, the overrated reaction is a reminder of how persuasive a technology-driven product can be, whether it's a "world-changing" app, social media, or a dramatic flick by Netflix, guilty of the same tactics their film is attempting to criticize. 💩

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Povilas GodliauskasWell-being Psychologist | Mentor | Lecturer | Consultant | HR |
"Show people something popular because it's probably something good" does not sound intelligent. No smart person would assume that popular = good. Furthermore, their job was to create products that increase profits. And they did. Of course, I am not blaming the engineers. They just did what they were asked, but that's in itself a problem.
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