Povilas Godliauskas on Psychological ResilienceWell-being Psychologist | Lecturer | Consultant | Mentor | HR |Some time ago
In the past year or so, I have been struggling with chronic health issues. ☁️ It's nothing serious: regular colds, some throat issues, and fatigue, caused by acid reflux and probably stressful lifestyle. However, the changes in my physical health were so sudden and unexpected that they considerably affected my emotional wellbeing and life satisfaction. While I still consider myself young (I am 27), it has been hard to accept the fact that I am not and probably will not be the strong and healthy person I was in my younger years. 🤔 So I realized: if I want to keep enjoying my life to the fullest, I have to do something about it. This is what I have been working on recently: - To reduce fatigue and improve my mood, I started attending dance classes again, but this time online. I am dancing for about 45-60 minutes every other day. Steezy offers a great product for that. Feel free to check them out! It's not awkward. ☺️ - To reduce my stress levels, I decided to spend more time doing pleasurable activities (at least 1-2 hours per day), such as going out for a walk in the forest (Pavilniai are great for that) or grab a proper meal. I am also planning to travel more around different Lithuanian cities. 🥾 - To improve my general wellbeing, I am thinking of going to therapy or coaching in order to work on some of my core beliefs (e.g. "you have to work your ass off in order to do something pleasurable") which probably led to my physical problems in the first place. 🧠 Moral of the story: respect your body and your health; it is the most precious thing you have in your life, as it ensures everything else. Also, take care of yourself like you care for your family, your closest friends, or your pet. Be your own best friend! P. S. And don't forget doing weird things for fun, such as standing on random stones in Birštonas, lol.

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Justas JanauskasCEO @ Qoorio, Co-Founder @ Vinted, Angel Investor
Thanks for sharing with!
over 1 year ago
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Povilas GodliauskasWell-being Psychologist | Lecturer | Consultant | Mentor | HR |
, my pleasure. Thanks for the great platform!
over 1 year ago
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Povilas Godliauskas on Psychological ResilienceWell-being Psychologist | Lecturer | Consultant | Mentor | HR |Some time ago
#Anxiety is not a disorder; it is our internal alarm system. The purpose of this alarm system is to let us know that we are likely in danger. 🔥 Metaphorically speaking, our “anxiety alarm” starts howling when we are on the brink of causing a fire in the kitchen or reminds us to lock the door at night. 🐯 Historically speaking, it warns us about hungry tigers or other tribes trying to eat your food or you, for that matter. Fortunately or not, our alarm systems are highly sensitive, so they tend to overreact or even grow into full-fledged #anxiety disorders, especially nowadays when the dangers are less immediate or predictable. The modern dangers range from #social dangers, such as pressure to conform or public shaming, to #geopolitical ones, such as culture wars and cyber warfare. ❓ So what should we do to "hack" this somewhat nutty but relatively adaptive alarm system? According to clinical psychologist Eric Goodman, #anxiety is like a wild animal. Yes, the anxiety beast might look or sound gruesome. Yet, it might behave naughtily or bite. But essentially, it wants to be fed and taken care of like any other pet. Therefore, our goal is to understand and embrace anxiety, not ignore or suppress it. Remember, you do not want to set your house on fire or find your car stolen. 🙈 So, if you want to befriend your anxiety beast, read Goodman’s “Your Anxiety Beast and You”! I already finished half of it, and I am still amazed by the simplicity and value of the book. It’s truly a gem of very useful information balanced with easy-to-understand images and metaphors. Have a wonderful day, and be kind to your anxiety beast. ❤️

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Povilas GodliauskasWell-being Psychologist | Lecturer | Consultant | Mentor | HR |
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Povilas Godliauskas on Psychological ResilienceWell-being Psychologist | Lecturer | Consultant | Mentor | HR |Some time ago
#suicidepreventionday There was a period in my life when I was seriously considering suicide as a reasonable option. The reasoning was as follows: ↪️ Suffering reduces our health and wellbeing ↪️ Everyone suffers for one reason or another ↪️ I produce more suffering when I am alive ↪️ I want to reduce the suffering in the world ↪️ Therefore, I would rather not live At the time, I was not a "happy" person (to be honest, I am not sure if I am right now), so it is likely that my thinking was constrained by negative emotions and cognitive biases. After around 5 or more therapy sessions, I started questioning the idea that suffering was necessarily bad (huge thanks to my therapist who pushed back on my ideas and never gave up on me 🙏). I realized that suffering is what actually makes life interesting by forcing us to re-evaluate our goals and move forward. Although I still believe that we could do better, especially in places torn by war and hunger, I do not treat suffering as an illness anymore. This is what I learnt from the period: if you are in pain, don't go only for the pleasurable (too short-term) or the meaningful (too long-term). Go rather for the interesting! Being a little bit more curious about yourself, others, and the world does not require you to have a lot of money, many friends, or even go outside. Here is a list of interesting activities you can do to increase your curiosity: ➡️ Explore new music, cinema, or literature ➡️ Express more gratitude to strangers ➡️ Message/call an old friend or colleague ➡️ Rearrange the furniture in your room ➡️ Take a free course on a weird topic ➡️ Try a new physical exercise every day ➡️ Share your knowledge for free ➡️ Start writing humorous short stories ➡️ Visit the parts of the city you've never been to ➡️ Write an autobiography Also, remember that (1) your suffering won't last forever, (2) you are not alone, and (3) asking for help can be also interesting. So, take care of yourself and stay curious. 💛
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Povilas GodliauskasWell-being Psychologist | Lecturer | Consultant | Mentor | HR |
And in my experience, people who state that they are fully free from any pain or suffering are usually in denial. :) But I would like to be wrong.
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Povilas Godliauskas on Psychological ResilienceWell-being Psychologist | Lecturer | Consultant | Mentor | HR |Some time ago
Why do I feel that Slack (the software) is not good for your productivity and wellbeing? 🤔 Fortunately, I don't have to use it very often, but many do e v e r y s i n g l e d a y, and I am not sure what to make of it... Any smart alternatives or ways to go about the drawbacks of Slack and similar software???

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Povilas GodliauskasWell-being Psychologist | Lecturer | Consultant | Mentor | HR |
, how do you talk to your team, especially if you all are working remotely?
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