Gamze Fackelmann on Health and happinessSuccess Coach | Entrepreneur | Content CreatorSome time ago
Who hates that afternoon slump? 😅 https://youtu.be/b9eD3Exx83s Ps. I love learning and improving through video, what is your preference? 📹? 📖? 🎙?
How To Beat The Afternoon Slump & Re-energize Yourself!
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Albane Derycke on Happiness is in the little thingsManagement studentSome time ago
Material stuff will not make us as happy as we thought it would, nor will marriage (on the long-run). Humans are very bad at identifying what will make them happy. On the other hand, something that will work is gratefulness, random acts of kindness, or making new social connections.
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Albane Derycke on Happiness is in the little thingsManagement studentSome time ago
It happens often that our minds' strongest intuitions are wrong, so we will follow an idea and realise after that it didn't have as much impact as we thought it would. These bias are very common but once you know they exist, you can avoid them
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Marius Čiuželis on Impact investments & Social entrepreneurshipInvestor / Advisor / Social EntrepreneurSome time ago
What keeps us healthy and happy as we go through life? Over 80 percent of millennials said that a major life goal for them was to get rich. And another 50 percent of those same young adults said that another major life goal was to become famous. The Harvard Study of Adult Development may be the longest study of adult life that's ever been done. What are the lessons that come from the tens of thousands of pages of information that have been generated on these lives? Well, the lessons aren't about wealth or fame or working harder and harder. The clearest message that we get from this 75-year study is this: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier. Period. Close relationships, more than money or fame, are what keep people happy throughout their lives. Those ties protect people from life’s discontents, help to delay mental and physical decline, and are better predictors of long and happy lives than social class, IQ, or even genes. We've learned three big lessons about relationships. (1) The first is that social connections are really good for us, and that loneliness kills. It turns out that people who are more socially connected to family, to friends, to community, are happier, they're physically healthier, and they live longer than people who are less well connected. And the experience of loneliness turns out to be toxic. People who are more isolated than they want to be from others find that they are less happy, their health declines earlier in midlife, their brain functioning declines sooner and they live shorter lives than people who are not lonely. (2) And we know that you can be lonely in a crowd and you can be lonely in a marriage, so the second big lesson that we learned is that it's not just the number of friends you have, and it's not whether or not you're in a committed relationship, but it's the quality of your close relationships that matters. It turns out that living in the midst of conflict is really bad for our health. High-conflict marriages, for example, without much affection, turn out to be very bad for our health, perhaps worse than getting divorced. And living in the midst of good, warm relationships is protective. (3) And the third big lesson that we learned about relationships and our health is that good relationships don't just protect our bodies, they protect our brains. It turns out that being in a securely attached relationship to another person in your 80s is protective, that the people who are in relationships where they really feel they can count on the other person in times of need, those people's memories stay sharper longer. And the people in relationships where they feel they really can't count on the other one, those are the people who experience earlier memory decline. And those good relationships, they don't have to be smooth all the time. Some of our octogenarian couples could bicker with each other day in and day out, but as long as they felt that they could really count on the other when the going got tough, those arguments didn't take a toll on their memories. So this message, that good, close relationships are good for our health and well-being, this is wisdom that's as old as the hills. Why is this so hard to get and so easy to ignore? Well, we're human. What we'd really like is a quick fix, something we can get that'll make our lives good and keep them that way. Relationships are messy and they're complicated and the hard work of tending to family and friends, it's not sexy or glamorous. It's also lifelong. It never ends. The people who fared the best were the people who leaned in to relationships, with family, with friends, with community. The Harvard Study of Adult Development: https://www.adultdevelopmentstudy.org
Harvard Second Generation Study
www.adultdevelopmentstudy.org
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